Harvard’s Photo Exhibit Is Just In Time For New Ken Burns PBS Documentary

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Harvard University’s Lamont/Pusey Library presents selections from the photographic series Theodore Roosevelt – “How I Love Sagamore Hill” by Xiomáro (SEE-oh-MAH-ro).  The New York artist was commissioned by the National Park Service to photograph the interiors of the president’s “Summer Whitehouse” at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Oyster Bay, New York.  The 26 color photographs featured in the free exhibit is on view now until December 31, 2014.  A limited edition photo e-Book, based on the series, can be downloaded for free at www.xiomaro.com.

Theodore Roosevelt:  "How I Love Sagamore Hill" by Xiomaro
Theodore Roosevelt: “How I Love Sagamore Hill” by Xiomaro

The exhibit is timely as Ken Burns’ documentary, The Roosevelts:  An Intimate History, will debut this month on PBS, which explores the political dynasty of TR, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt.  Burns graduated from Harvard as did TR, whose personal papers are housed at the school.  “Anyone who watches the documentary should see the exhibit – the photographs will jump to life and relevance,” explained Xiomáro.

The artist’s photographs show the house in a historically rare condition:  the 23 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant as part of a 3 year, $8 million structural rehabilitation.  Apart from these images, the public will never see the interiors in this state nor can they visit the house until the structural work is complete.  The last significant body of interior photographs, in black-and-white with the interiors fully-furnished, is at the Library of Congress and was created in 1966 by Samuel Gottscho.

The rooms depicted are where significant international affairs were transacted when the president retreated to Oyster Bay to escape Washington, DC’s oppressive heat.  Negotiations to end the Russo-Japanese war began at Sagamore Hill for which Roosevelt became the first American to win a Nobel Prize.  The Panama Canal and the creation of the Navy’s Great White Fleet also have their genesis at the mansion.

The photographs are also unique in focusing, not only TR, but on his wife, children and servants to give a sense of what life was like in the household.  “Even though the rooms are nearly vacant, the photographs reveal the president’s imposing character and the intimate nature of the First Family,” said the artist.  “These nuances get overwhelmed by the furnishings or are inaccessible during a house tour behind velvet rope barriers.”

Xiomáro is a nationally exhibited artist whose work has been covered by The New York Times, The Huffington Post, News 12 and Fine Art Connoisseur.   Other commissions from the National Park Service include Boston Harbor Islands, Old Mastic House at Fire Island National Seashore (home of William Floyd, a signer of the Declaration of Independence) and the farmhouse and art studios at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut (home of both J. Alden Weir, a founder of American impressionist painting, and Mahonri Young, a sculptor of the Ashcan School).

Xiomaro Honored by Town for “How I Love Sagamore Hill” Photo Series

Xio_Town_of_NH

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  August 14, 2014
MEDIA CONTACTS:  Carole Trottere, Ryan Mulholland, Sam Marksheid, and Rebecca Cheng | (516) 869-7794

Xiomaro Honored by Town for “How I Love Sagamore Hill” Photo Series

North Hempstead, NY – North Hempstead Town Councilman Peter Zuckerman honored renowned photographer and  Roslyn Heights resident Xiomaro on August 12th, for his wonderful contributions to the field of photography, including his beautiful photo series titled “How I Love Sagamore Hill” which features unique photos of President Theodore Roosevelt’s home.

Xiomaro has photographed a number of historical landmarks on Long Island and expressed interest in working on a series on the grounds of Cedarmere in North Hempstead, once renovations have been completed.  Some of Xiomaro’s remarkable work was on display in the board room while he was honored.

Xio_Town_of_NH2
Left to Right: Councilman Angelo Ferrara, Councilman Peter Zuckerman,Town Clerk Wayne Wink, Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth, Xiomaro with his wife and son, Councilwoman Lee Seeman, Councilwoman Viviana Russell, Councilwoman Dina De Giorgio, Councilwoman Anna Kaplan.

Neiman Art Center Talk Reveals Photograph of Founding Father’s Slave Cemetery

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New York artist Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro) presented a talk at the LeRoy Neiman Art Center on August 6, 2014 to discuss his photographs, which are on display as part of the Center’s Courage and Creativity group exhibit.  One of the photographs that drew much interest and discussion depicted a little-known slave cemetery at the estate of one of the nation’s Founding Fathers.

Many audience members were unaware that the poignant black-and-white photograph of white crosses, with one bearing the name “Harry,” was from a slave burial plot located at the William Floyd Estate in Mastic Beach, Long Island, which is a National Park unit of Fire Island National Seashore.  The estate was the 4,400 acre plantation of General William Floyd, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and a colleague of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.

The Courage to Reveal the Truth
The Courage to Reveal the Truth

The photograph, titled The Courage to Reveal the Truth, was part of a larger series titled The Other Side – Charles, Caesar, Harry, Sam, Pompey, Lon and Isaac.  That series was exhibited during Black History Month this year at African Burial Ground National Monument in lower Manhattan.

“I’ve had folks tell me that I am being inaccurate and that there is no story to tell,” explains Xiomáro, “because there is no proof that anyone is actually buried under those crosses.  But history confirms that Floyd did have slaves on his plantation.  So, I’m exhibiting my photographs to raise public awareness, provoke dialogue and inspire further research about the graveyard.”  The artist encourages the Harlem community to visit the cemetery and to learn more about the larger historic site of which it is a part.  Admission is free of charge and visitors can explore the forest, fields, marsh and trails.  Free tours of Floyd’s 25 room mansion are also available.

Xiomáro is a nationally exhibited artist whose work has been covered by The New York TimesThe Huffington PostFine Art Connoisseur and News 12 Long Island.  At present, 130 of his photographs can be seen at eight exhibits from Boston to Philadelphia including Harvard University and the Long Island Museum.  Xiomáro turned to fine art photography after a career as an entertainment attorney representing Pop and Hip Hop artists such as Lisa Lisa, Village People, MC Shan and young rap artists produced by Guru and Premier of Gangstarr.  His goal now is to use photography to draw new and diverse audiences into the National Parks in keeping with a mandate issued by Ken Salazar, who was appointed Secretary of the Department of the Interior (2009-13) by President Obama.

Xiomáro’s talk was part of a larger presentation with other artists in the Courage and Creativity group exhibit.  The renowned artist, Henri Matisse, observed that “creativity takes courage.”  In keeping with this theme, the Neiman Art Center invited a number of contemporary artists that are unafraid to express emotions and ideas for public consideration and critique.

The LeRoy Neiman Art Center was launched six years ago through a generous gift from the acclaimed American painter LeRoy Neiman (1921-2012) who is known for his expressive and boldly colored images of sporting events and leisure activities.  The Art Center is located at 2785 Frederick Douglass Boulevard near 148th Street in Harlem, New York City.

For more information about the Art Center, visit:  www.artshorizons.org.  For more information about Xiomáro and for a free eBook, visit www.xiomaro.com.

National Park Service Commissions Xiomáro To Photograph Boston Harbor Islands and Launch Artist-in-Residence Program

Xiomaro | Photo by Daniel Brennan
Photo by Daniel Brennan

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This summer, visitors to the Boston Harbor Islands may encounter the lens of New York artist Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro).

The National Park Service has commissioned the fine art photographer to create a visual collection of Peddocks, Spectacle and other islands that will be exhibited throughout the state to raise public awareness of the recreational area and to launch the newly created Artist-in-Residence program.  The exhibits will be supported with artist talks and other public programming.

Xiomáro is a nationally exhibited artist whose work has been covered by The New York TimesThe Huffington PostFine Art Connoisseur and News 12 Long Island.  He is frequently commissioned by the National Park Service to create photographic collections that breathe life into iconic American leaders and historical sites.

The artist’s photographic collections include the home of President Theodore Roosevelt at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, which is presently on a year-long solo exhibit at Harvard University.  Xiomáro also photographed the estate of William Floyd (a signer of the Declaration of Independence) at Fire Island National Seashore.  A collection based on the slave cemetery located at the estate was exhibited during Black History Month at New York City’s African Burial Ground National Monument.

“My goal is to create a collection that will draw viewers for its art and then encourage them to enjoy the islands’ recreational opportunities and to appreciate their unique history and culture,” explains Xiomáro.  “And developing the existing tourist base for the islands provides a much-needed economic boost for the region’s economy.”

The project will also serve to launch an Artist-in-Residence program for which Xiomaro will be its first.  He began his career as an Artist-in-Residence at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut where he continues as a Visiting Artist.  “So I can attest to the importance for establishing something similar in the islands, where I’ll be residing intermittently to help establish the program.  There’s a historical relationship between artists and parks.  The works of photographers and painters like Ansel Adams and Albert Bierstadt helped to preserve many areas that are now national parks.”

A free e-book containing some of Xiomáro’s work is available at http://www.xiomaro.com.

Fire Island Presents “Revolutionary” Photo Exhibit at Patchogue Ferry Terminal

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The first artistic collection of photographs documenting William Floyd’s Old Mastic House will be presented by Fire Island National Seashore at the Patchogue Ferry Terminal.  The exhibit, The William Floyd Estate Comes to Fire Island, opens on July 4 and remains on view until August 17, 2014.  Some of the images are drawn from the collection’s debut at New York City’s Fraunces Tavern Museum when they were exhibited as William Floyd’s House of Revolution.

The public is also invited to a free artist reception at the Terminal on Sunday, July 20, from 3:00 pm to 6:00 pm.  Light refreshments will be available as well as a free drawing to win a 5″x7″ print from the exhibit that will be signed by the artist.

Xiomaro - William Floyd's House of Revolution
Xiomaro – William Floyd’s House of Revolution

Old Mastic House was the Mastic Beach home of General William Floyd, an American revolutionary and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, who served with George Washington.  Floyd escaped to Middletown, Connecticut, during the British occupation of Long Island.  After his return seven years later, Floyd restored and enlarged the ransacked house where he entertained Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.  Eight generations of Floyds remained until they donated the estate to the National Park Service.  Today, the public can enjoy free tours of the 25 room house and explore the surrounding 613 acres of forest, fields, marsh and trails, all of which are a park unit of Fire Island National Seashore.

The photographs, created by Long Island artist Xiomáro (see-oh-mah-ro), were commissioned by the National Park Service and present:  an introduction to William Floyd through his personal items; the house as a silent witness to the Floyds’ involvement in American wars beyond the Revolution; and a peek into some of the key rooms one can visit during a tour of the house as well as two “secret” locations not open for public view.  Seventeen photographs – seven large prints and ten smaller ones – were selected from over 200 images created under the commission to present extremely rare views.  Historical artifacts from Old Mastic House will also be on display.

Old Mastic House
Old Mastic House

Xiomáro is a nationally exhibited artist from Long Island who uses photography to breathe life into iconic American figures and historical sites.  His work has been covered by The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Fine Art Connoisseur and News 12 Long Island.  He began as an Artist-in-Residence at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut and continues his relationship there as a Visiting Artist.

His other commissions from the National Park Service include:  Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, the Oyster Bay home and Summer White House of President Theodore Roosevelt; the farmhouse and studio of Julian Alden Weir, a founder of American Impressionist painting; the studio of Mahonri Young, a sculptor of the Ashcan School; and the Boston Harbor Islands.

At present, Xiomáro’s work can be seen at Harvard University and at Stony Brook’s Long Island Museum.  For more information and for a free exhibit eBook, visit www.xiomaro.com.

 

Harvard’s Photo Exhibit Features Rarely Seen Views of Theodore Roosevelt’s Summer White House

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Harvard University’s Lamont/Pusey Library presents selections from the photographic series Theodore Roosevelt – “How I Love Sagamore Hill” by Xiomáro (SEE-oh-MAH-ro).  The New York artist was commissioned by the National Park Service to photograph the interiors of the president’s “Summer Whitehouse” at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Oyster Bay, New York.  The 26 color photographs featured in the free exhibit is on view now until December 31, 2014.  A limited edition photo e-Book, based on the series, can be downloaded for free at www.xiomaro.com.

Xiomaro_Theodore_Roosevelt Xiomáro’s photographs show the house in a historically rare condition:  the 23 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant as part of a 3 year, $7.2 million structural rehabilitation.  Apart from these images, the public will never see the interiors in this state nor can they visit the house until the structural work is complete.  The last significant body of interior photographs, in black-and-white with the interiors fully-furnished, is at the Library of Congress and was created in 1966 by Samuel Gottscho.

The rooms depicted are where significant international affairs were transacted when the president retreated to Oyster Bay to escape Washington, DC’s oppressive heat.  Negotiations to end the Russo-Japanese war began at Sagamore Hill for which Roosevelt became the first American to win a Nobel Prize.  The Panama Canal and the creation of the Navy’s Great White Fleet also have their genesis at the mansion.

Xiomáro’s exhibit is timely in that filmmaker Ken Burns, a Harvard graduate, is releasing The Roosevelts, a new PBS documentary that explores the political dynasty of TR, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt.  The photographs are also unique in focusing, not only TR, but on his wife, children and servants to give a sense of what life was like in the household.  “Even though the rooms are nearly vacant, the photographs reveal the president’s imposing character and the intimate nature of the First Family,” explained the artist.  “These nuances get overwhelmed by the furnishings or are inaccessible during a house tour behind velvet rope barriers.”

Xiomáro is a nationally exhibited artist whose work has been covered by The New York Times, The Huffington Post and Fine Art Connoisseur.  Other commissions from the National Park Service include Old Mastic House at Fire Island National Seashore (home of William Floyd, a signer of the Declaration of Independence) and the farmhouse and art studios at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut (home of both J. Alden Weir, a founder of American impressionist painting, and Mahonri Young, a sculptor of the Ashcan School).

Harlem’s “Courage and Creativity” Exhibit Features Photographs From Xiomáro

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The Courage To Free Your Soul
The Courage To Free Your Soul

Photographs created by New York artist Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro) will be included in the LeRoy Neiman Art Center’s exhibit Courage and Creativity from June 2 to July 12, 2014 in Harlem, New York City.

The exhibit showcases works inspired by an observation attributed to the renowned artist, Henri Matisse:  “creativity takes courage.”  In keeping with this theme, the Art Center invited a number of contemporary artists that are unafraid to express emotions and ideas for public consideration and critique.

The Art Center selected three large black-and-white photographs from Xiomáro.  The Courage to Free Your Soul is a candid portrait of Saint, an indie musician captured in a rapturous moment of playing his guitar at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut.  The Courage to Reveal the Truth presents a poignant view of white crosses at what is believed to be a slave burial ground at the estate of William Floyd (a Founding Father who signed of the Declaration of Independence), which is a National Park Service site on Long Island.  For The Courage to Break the Rules, Xiomáro disconnected the lens from his camera to create an other-worldly image of the lighthouse at Cape May Point, New Jersey.

The Courage to Reveal the Truth
The Courage to Reveal the Truth

Xio is a nationally recognized artist whose work has been exhibited during Black History Month at African Burial Ground National Monument in New York City and is currently on display at Harvard University for a year-long exhibition.  The artist has been covered by The New York TimesThe Huffington PostFine Art Connoisseur and many other national media outlets.  He began as an Artist-in-Residence at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut where he continues as a Visiting Artist and is frequently commissioned by the National Park Service to create photographic collections that breathe life into iconic historical leaders.  A free e-book containing some of Xiomáro’s work is available at www.xiomaro.com.

Twelve other artists are part of the exhibit including Ellsworth Ausby, Nancy Elsamanoudi and Hubert Williams.  Forty percent of the proceeds of all sales from the Courage & Creativity exhibit will benefit the Arts Center as well as Arts Horizons, a non-profit arts-in-education organization tasked with strengthening the Harlem community and beyond by providing quality arts experiences for children and families.

The Courage to Break the Rules
The Courage to Break the Rules

In addition, Art Splash 2014 is a fundraising companion event taking place on June 5, 2014, from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm, to recognize several individuals whose professional achievements represent the courage and creativity promoted by the exhibit.  Sarah Dash from the famed pop group LaBelle is one of the honorees.

The LeRoy Neiman Art Center was launched six years ago through a generous gift from the renowned American painter LeRoy Neiman (1921-2012) who is known for his expressive and boldly colored images of sporting events and leisure activities.  The Art Center is located at 2785 Frederick Douglass Boulevard near 148th Street in Harlem, New York City.

“Long Island at War” Exhibit Features Photographs From Xiomáro

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Long Island at War
Long Island at War

Photographs created by Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro) will be included in the Long Island Museum’s large scale exhibit Long Island at War:  Battle Front and Home Front, from May 23 to December 29, 2014, in Stony Brook, New York.

He is the only contemporary artist to be included in an exhibit featuring over 200 artifacts, paintings, and historical photographs drawn from many prominent museum and private collections.

Xiomáro’s photographs from the William Floyd Estate in Mastic and Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill in Oyster Bay were selected by the museum to visually unify the exhibit’s six sections on each of America’s military engagements.

The artist created the photographs under commissions by the National Park Service.  William Floyd, who signed the Declaration of Independence and fought in the Revolutionary War under George Washington, will be prominently featured with photographs of his house in Mastic, his rarely seen ceremonial sword and the Chippendale desk from which he worked.  His descendants’ involvement in subsequent wars is also included.  A photograph of a Civil War recruitment poster represents his grandson’s service in the Union Army.  William Floyd Nichols’ World War II jacket and other memorabilia are displayed in another photograph taken in one of the dining rooms of the house in Mastic, which is open to the public as part of Fire Island National Seashore.

Civil War Recruitment Poster
Civil War Recruitment Poster

For the Spanish-American War, Long Island’s other National Park comes into view with an imposing photograph of Theodore Roosevelt resplendent in his Rough Rider uniform.  Xiomáro created the close-up from a painting hanging in Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

Xio is a nationally exhibited artist who uses photography to breathe life into iconic American figures.  His work has been covered by The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Fine Art Connoisseur and many other national media outlets.  He began as an Artist-in-Residence at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut, where he continues as a Visiting Artist.  His solo exhibit at Harvard University features his Sagamore Hill collection.

An opportunity to delve deeper into the William Floyd and Sagamore Hill photographs will be offered to the public through an Artist Talk and Q&A that Xiomáro will be presenting on Sunday, October 19, 2014 from 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm at the Long Island Museum’s Gillespie Room located in the Carriage Museum Building.

Long Island at War is the first major museum exhibition centering on the region’s many significant and continuing connections to American military history.  Long Island has been a crucial and often unsung player in nearly every American war.  From Brooklyn to Montauk, generations of Long Island men and women have served and sacrificed for the country’s cause, and the region has been essential to the industrial supply, combat training, and coastal defense of the nation.  The region’s military role has been vital, multifaceted, and ever-present:  the Battle of Long Island in 1776, the essential war products created by Grumman Corporation and other Long Island-based companies in World War II, the solemn resting place provided to today’s fallen military heroes at Calverton National Cemetery.

The Long Island Museum is a Smithsonian Affiliate and is located at 1200 Route 25A, Stony Brook, NY  11790.  A free e-book containing some of Xiomáro’s work is available at xiomaro.com.

Harvard Photo Exhibit Features Rarely Seen Views of Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill

 

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Harvard University’s Lamont/Pusey Library opens the New Year with selections from the photographic series Theodore Roosevelt – “How I Love Sagamore Hill” by Xiomáro.  The New York artist was commissioned by Theodore Roosevelt's Sagamore Hill by Xiomaro 003the National Park Service to photograph the interiors of the president’s “Summer Whitehouse” at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

The 26 photographs featured in the free exhibit will remain on view at the library from January 26 to December 31, 2014.  An opening reception, artist talk and gallery tour are being scheduled.  A limited edition photo e-Book, based on the series, can be downloaded for free at www.xiomaro.com.

Xiomáro’s photographs show the house in a historically rare condition:  the 23 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant as part of a three-year, $7.2 million structural rehabilitation.  The last significant body of interior photographs, albeit fully-furnished, is at the Library of Congress and was created in 1966 by Samuel Gottscho.

Xiomáro’s exhibit is timely in that filmmaker Ken Burns, a Harvard graduate, is releasing The Roosevelts, a new PBS documentary that explores the political dynasty of TR, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt.  The exhibit is also unique in that Xiomáro’s photographs do not solely focus on TR, but also draw attention to his wife, children and servants to give a sense of what life was like in the household.  “Even though the rooms are nearly vacant, the photographs reveal the imposing character of America’s 26th president and the more intimate domestic nature of his family,” explained the artist.  “Some of these nuances are overwhelmed by a room’s furnishings or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers.”

Xiomáro is a nationally exhibited artist whose work has been covered by The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Fine Art Connoisseur and other media outlets.  He is known for using photography to draw attention to historical sites where American figures lived and worked to pursue their vision.  Other projects with the National Park Service include Old Mastic House at Fire Island National Seashore (home of William Floyd, a signer of the Declaration of Independence) and the farmhouse and art studios at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut (home of both J. Alden Weir, a founder of American impressionist painting, and Mahonri Young, a sculptor of the Ashcan School).  “My goal is that, after experiencing these collections, viewers will feel compelled to visit the parks where they, too, can examine these leaders and explore the ideas that shaped our culture,” explains the artist.

Rarely seen dual peacocks in wallpaper
Rarely seen dual peacocks in wallpaper
TR's nearly vacant Library
TR’s nearly vacant Library

New York City’s African Burial Ground National Monument Exhibits Photographic Memorial of Little Known Slave Cemetery During Black History Month

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New York City’s African Burial Ground National Monument celebrates Black History Month with the photographic exhibit The Other Side – Charles, Caesar, Harry, Sam, Pompey, Lon and Isaac by New York artist Xiomáro.

The Other Side is the first photographic series centering on the burial ground of the little-known slaves from the William Floyd Estate in Mastic, Long Island, which is now a National Park unit of Fire Island National Seashore.  Floyd signed the Declaration of Independence and served with George Washington.

The series is a spiritual memorial of these slaves and seeks to dignify them as individuals.  Separated by a white wooden fence, their simple, year-less crucifixes bearing singular generic slave names are juxtaposed with the elaborate individualized tombstones of the Floyd cemetery.

Slavery’s complicated history was not limited to the south and was economically integral to some of the Founding Fathers.  Over time, Floyd’s descendants decreased their slave holdings and his grandson enlisted in the Union army with other men that he recruited.

The Other Side

The photographs were created by Xiomáro (SEE-oh-MAH-ro), a nationally exhibited artist whose work has been covered by The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Fine Art Connoisseur and many other media outlets.  He is known for using photography to draw attention to important historical sites.  Other projects with the National Park Service include Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill mansion in Oyster Bay (on exhibit at Harvard University) and the farmhouse and art studios at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut (home of both J. Alden Weir, a founder of American impressionist painting, and Mahonri Young, a sculptor of the Ashcan School).  “My goal is that, after experiencing these collections, viewers will visit the parks to better understand our history, especially lesser known locations like the William Floyd Estate and its slave burial ground,” explains the artist.

The 10 large photographs featured in the free exhibit will remain on view at African Burial Ground National Monument, 290 Broadway in Lower Manhattan, from February 1 to 31, 2014.  A free artist talk and mini exhibit will be held at Oyster Bay Historical Society, 20 Summit Street, Oyster Bay, on Sunday, February 9, 2:00 pm, and a free limited edition photo e-book, based on the series, can be downloaded at www.xiomaro.com.