Sea Cliff’s K. DiResta Collective Exhibits “City Grids, Country Patterns” Photos

www.xiomaro.com | Contact Me

Roslyn Heights artist, Xiomáro, presents his new photographic art series, City Grids, Country Patterns, at Sea Cliff’s K. DiResta Collective from October 1 to November 1, 2013.

New York City - View from Governors Island
New York City – View from Governors Island

The 12 photographs in the series juxtapose views of contemporary New York City skyscrapers with those of J. Alden Weir’s historically preserved Connecticut home and grounds now known as Weir Farm National Historic SiteWeir was part of an eminent family art dynasty and a founder of American Impressionism whose works now hang at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Each photograph is a close-up so that the series transitions from modern grids to organic patterns, which highlights the abstract beauty within each subject.

“There’s a tradition of artists, like J. Alden Weir, who lived and painted in the country, but made their reputations in the cultural world and art market of New York City,” explains Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro).

Peeper in Marsh - Weir Farm National Historic Site
Peeper in Marsh – Weir Farm National Historic Site

Xiomáro is a nationally exhibited artist who is frequently commissioned by the National Park Service to artistically photograph historical sites.  His other collections include Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill mansion in Oyster Bay, which was covered by the New York Times and will be exhibited at Harvard University next year.

His photographs of the William Floyd house in Mastic, Long Island, are on exhibit at New York City’s Fraunces Tavern Museum.  His collections can be seen and purchased at his website, www.xiomaro.com, where a free souvenir print from the City Grids, Country Patterns exhibit is available.

Xiomaro’s City Grids, Country Patterns opens on October 1 at K. DiResta Collective, 212 Sea Cliff Avenue, Sea Cliff, and remains on view until November 1, 2013.  The photographs complement the line of geometric jewelry designed by gallery owner Kathleen DiResta-Roth who also oversees the Sea Cliff Council of the Arts.

Admission to the gallery is free and hours are Tuesday to Saturday from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm.  All other days and hours are by appointment by calling (917) 767-9216.

Fraunces Tavern® Museum Presents “William Floyd’s House of Revolution”

www.xiomaro.com | Contact Me

William Floyd's House of Revolution at Fraunces Tavern Museum
William Floyd’s House of Revolution at Fraunces Tavern Museum

“William Floyd’s House of Revolution,” a new photographic exhibit by New York artist Xiomáro, opens on July 4 at Fraunces Tavern® Museum (54 Pearl Street, New York City) and remains on view until December 1, 2013.  The exhibit includes documents and other artifacts pertaining to Floyd and his great grandson, Frederick Tallmadge.

The collection of 18 photographs, on display in the Museum’s Messick Gallery, artistically documents the home of William Floyd, an American revolutionary and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.  The home, known as The Old Mastic House, is located in Mastic, Long Island, and is part of the Fire Island National Seashore.

National Park Service Commission

The photographs were commissioned by the National Park Service and present interior views and perspectives that visitors to the sprawling 25 room house are not likely to see.  The photographs also include rare close-ups of Floyd’s signature and personal items such as his snuff box and traveling “medicine” chest that actually carried liquor.

William Floyd's Signature
William Floyd’s Signature

Together with fellow rebels like George Washington, Floyd served in the first Continental Congress in 1774.  By the late 1770s, the British occupied Long Island and Floyd escaped to Connecticut.  Floyd returned to a ransacked house, which he restored to receive visitors such as Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and other notable guests.

Evolution of a House and Country

Remarkably, Old Mastic House was continuously occupied by Floyd’s descendants up until 1976 when it was donated to the National Park Service.  So the photographs also show how both the house and the new nation grew, expanded and evolved together through history.  Like America’s motto – e pluribus unum – the house stands as one unified historical structure comprised of many evolving styles in architecture, furnishings, design and technology.

The Fraunces Tavern® Museum, a complex of five buildings with nine galleries, is where George Washington bade farewell to the officers of the Continental Army.  The museum houses an extensive collection of Revolutionary War era artifacts.  Free guided tours are available on the weekends.

William Floyd’s Old Mastic House is located at 245 Park Drive, Mastic Beach, Long Island and is part of Fire Island National Seashore.  In addition to offering free house tours , visitors can avail themselves of Fire Island’s dynamic barrier island beaches, which offer solitude, camaraderie and spiritual renewal.

See The Photos, Then Visit The Parks

Old Mastic House
Old Mastic House

Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro), is a nationally exhibited artist who uses photography to interpret historical sites within the National Park Service where iconic American figures lived and worked to pursue their vision.  He began as an Artist-in-Residence at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Wilton, Connecticut, which is the homestead of Julian Alden Weir, one of the founders of American Impressionism.  He continues his relationship with the park as a Visiting Artist.  His other photographic commissions from the National Park Service include Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill mansion in Oyster Bay, which will be exhibited at Harvard University next year.

“My goal is that viewers of these photographs will feel compelled to visit the parks where they, too, can examine these leaders and explore the ideas that shaped our culture.  Experiencing our heritage and open spaces also ensures their preservation and conservation,” explains the artist.  His collections can be seen and purchased at his website:  www.xiomaro.com.  A free 60 page eBook and a 4″ x 6″ souvenir print are also available there.

Press Release: Photo Exhibit at Mayor Pavia’s Gallery Features Rarely Seen Views of Weir Farm

www.xiomaro.com | Contact Me

J. Alden Weir's Painting Studio, Wilton, Connecticut
J. Alden Weir’s Painting Studio, Wilton, Connecticut

The Mayor’s Gallery in Stamford presents “Weir Was Here – Secret Rooms, Doors and Windows,” a photographic essay by Xiomaro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro).   The free exhibit runs until April 30, 2013 at Mayor Michael Pavia’s office at 888 Washington Boulevard, 10th floor, in Stamford, on weekdays from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.

The exhibit presents 38 images, the largest number ever exhibited, from the first artistic photographic collection documenting the beauty and textures of the key historical structures at Weir Farm National Historic Site located in Wilton and Ridgefield, which have never been seen by the general public.  The homestead was continuously occupied by artists starting with Julian Alden Weir, one of the founders of American Impressionism, and including Mahonri Young, a sculptor and painter of the Ashcan School.

Congressman Jim Himes, whose office is just down the hall from the Mayor’s Gallery, remarked that “the photographs are almost haunting.  You stare at them and there are just multiple levels of things that you see.  In fact, I liked it so much that for some time now I’ve had Xiomaro’s [work] hanging here in my Stamford office.”

Lina Morielli, the curator of the gallery, agreed that Xiomaro “managed to capture something about the essence of what was going on there.  There is a ghostlike quality.”  Morielli explained that although the images are all digital photographs, “some of them are very painterly.  They are composed in a way that makes you think that they could almost be something else.”

This fall the buildings will open to the public with the interiors fully furnished and significantly changed from how they appear now.  So the photographs offer a rare peek of what lies within these vacant rooms.  Xiomaro uses photography to draw attention to historical sites where American figures lived and worked to pursue their vision.  Other projects with the National Park Service include President Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill mansion, which will be exhibited at Harvard University next year.  “My goal is that after experiencing these collections, urban viewers will feel compelled to visit the parks where they, too, can examine these leaders and explore the ideas that shaped our culture,” explains the artist.  “As a product of New York City, I can attest to the inspiring and introspective effect these iconic, local places can have on one’s spirit.” 

The artist produced a video with commentary from Congressman Jim Himes, whose office is next door to Mayor Pavia, and Lina Morielli, the curator of the Mayor’s Gallery.

 

 

The artist is offering a free 4” x 6” souvenir print from the collection until the close of the exhibit on April 30, which can be obtained at his website www.xiomaro.com.  For information about visiting Weir Farm, go to www.nps.gov/wefa.

Press Release: Oyster Bay Photo Exhibit Features Rarely Seen Views of Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill

www.xiomaro.com | Contact Me

The Oyster Bay Historical Society opens its spring exhibition with the fine art photographic series Theodore Roosevelt – “How I Love Sagamore Hill” by Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro), a Long Island artist. Xiomáro photographed the interiors of the President’s house at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site. The collection of over 140 photographs was created last year during the removal of the mansion’s contents and furnishings as part of a three-year, $6.2 million structural rehabilitation by the National Parks Service. The debut exhibit features 20 photographs from the collection with each image uniquely titled so that a poetic narrative unfolds about TR and his household. The photographs remain on view at the Society’s Koenig Center through June 2. The exhibit then travels to Harvard University for a year-long display with plans to invite documentary filmmaker Ken Burns as a speaker.

Reception and Free Photo eBook

A catered reception with live music and a drawing to win a print from the exhibit is scheduled for Friday, March 8, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Koenig Center, 20 Summit Street, Oyster Bay. Admission to the reception is free of charge. The artist is also offering a free photo eBook, based on the exhibit, at his website: www.xiomaro.com. The website includes information on viewing hours and a series of free gallery talks presented by the artist.

Rarely Seen Views

Theodore Roosevelt's famed "North Room" by Xiomaro
Theodore Roosevelt’s famed “North Room” by Xiomaro

The photographs show the house in a historically rare condition in that the 22 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant. Yet, “so much of the Roosevelt family’s personality is revealed by the house,” said Xiomáro, “even though its occupants – and now most of its contents – are absent from the premises.” Images from the exhibition reveal not just the imposing character of America’s 26th President, but also the more intimate domestic nature of his family, such as the textured sconce globes of Edith Roosevelt’s drawing room. “Some of these details,” continued Xiomáro, “may have previously been overwhelmed by a room’s furnishing, or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers.”  The artist produced a video with commentary from staff at the Historical Society and Sagamore Hill as well as from Elizabeth Roosevelt, a descendant of the President.

Visit The Parks

Xiomáro uses photography to draw attention to historical sites where American figures lived and worked to pursue their vision. Other projects with the National Parks Service include William Floyd’s mansion at Fire Island National Seashore’s Old Mastic House (home of William Floyd, a signer of the Declaration of Independence) and Weir Farm National Historic Site’s buildings in Connecticut (home of J. Alden Weir, a founder of American impressionist painting). “My goal is that, after experiencing these collections, viewers will feel compelled to visit the parks where they, too, can examine these leaders and explore the ideas that shaped our culture,” explains the artist.

Drawing Room (a/k/a “Edith’s Room") by Xiomaro

Mother's Room - Winter Sunset by Xiomaro

Press Release: How I Love Sagamore Hill – A Photographic Collection by Xiomáro

www.xiomaro.com | Contact Me

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Philip Blocklyn
The Oyster Bay Historical Society and Koenig Center
(516) 922-5032 | obhsdirector@optonline.net

How I Love Sagamore Hill:  A Photographic Collection by Xiomáro
An exhibition organized by Xiomáro Art Studio in partnership with
Sagamore Hill National Historic Site and the Oyster Bay Historical Society

Theodore Roosevelt's Sagamore Hill by Xiomaro 003
Click The Image To Get A Free Photo e-Book

March 8 to June 2, 2013
Oyster Bay Historical Society’s Koenig Center | 20 Summit Street, Oyster Bay, New York 11771

Opening Reception on Friday, March 8, 6-8 pm | Light refreshments and live music | Free admission
Attendees will be entered into a drawing to win a free print
Click here for map and directions

Free Gallery Talks | 2:00 to 3:00 p.m
Saturday, March 16 | Sunday, April 14 | Saturday, May 18
The Koenig Center, 20 Summit Street, Oyster Bay NY
Attendees will be entered into a drawing to win a free print

The Oyster Bay Historical Society will open its spring exhibition with a reception on Friday March 8, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm at the Koenig Center at 20 Summit Street in Oyster Bay. How I Love Sagamore Hill exhibits a selection of photographs by Xiomáro, who photographed the interior of the President’s House at Sagamore Hill as it stood essentially vacant after the removal of its contents and furnishings in 2012 as part of a three-year, $6.2 million structural rehabilitation. The exhibition, presented in partnership with Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, will remain on view at the Society’s Koenig Center through June 2.

During the winter of 2012, Sagamore Hill National Historic Site commissioned Xiomáro to create an artistic photographic collection of Theodore Roosevelt’s Oyster Bay house in a historically rare condition—appearing much as it did when first occupied in 1887—following the removal of the twenty-two-room house’s furnishings, rugs, trophy heads, library, artwork, and other contents. A total of over one hundred images document rooms on all three floors, including the first floor’s North Room, dining room, pantry, drawing room, hall and library.

“So much of the Roosevelt family’s personality is revealed by the house,” said Xiomáro, “even though its occupants—and now most of its contents—are absent from the premises.” Images from the exhibition reveal not just the imposing character of America’s 26th President, but also the more intimate domestic nature of the Roosevelt family of Sagamore Hill, such as the textured sconce globes of Edith Roosevelt’s drawing room. “Some of these details,” continued Xiomáro, “may have previously been overwhelmed by a room’s furnishing, or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers.”

The Oyster Bay Historical Society is open Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm, Saturdays from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm, and Sundays from 1:00 to 4:00 pm. Admission to the exhibition, opening reception, and gallery talks is free. Donations are welcomed. For information, please call the Society at 516-922-5032 or visit oysterbayhistorical.org

The Winner of the Theodore Roosevelt Photo Art Exhibit Selection

www.xiomaro.com | Contact Me

Video Announcement of the Winner
Video Announcement of the Winner

“You think you’re going to
win a Special Edition print?”

Recently, I gave an open invitation to help select photos for my exhibit at the Oyster Bay Historical Society, March 8 to June 2, titled “Theodore Roosevelt: How I Love Sagamore Hill.”

The idea was to view an online portfolio of images I created of President Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill mansion and to submit favorites.  All participants get a free 4″ x 6″ souvenir print of the exhibit poster and a thank you on my website.

I’ll be writing more about what people selected and how they reacted to the photographs.  But, in the meantime, I hope you will enjoy this video where I randomly chose a winner to receive a free 8.5″ x 11″ Special Edition print of their choice.  Click my photo or click this link to watch.

Help Select Photos For My Next Exhibit and Get A Free Souvenir Print

www.xiomaro.com | Contact Me

And You’ll Also Be Entered For A Chance To Win A Special Edition Print

Here’s how it works:

1. Visit my website (www.xiomaro.com/TR.html) and pick your three favorite photos.

2. Email me your selections by clicking the “Contact” link on the upper right of my website.

3. For each selection, make sure to list my website’s page number and the photo’s ID number (it’s on the lower left corner):  e.g., “Page 1, photo 4 / 45.”

4. Include your postal address so that I can send you a free 4” x 6” souvenir print like the image below.  You will be thanked by name on my website – a link will be announced as the exhibit date approaches.

You will also be entered for a chance to win a Special Edition print (8.5” x 11”) of your choosing from the collection at the above link.  A winner will be randomly chosen and announced on New Year’s Eve.

By the way, after emailing me, you’re welcome to return to this blog and post your selections as a comment – it might be fun for everyone to see what others are choosing.

Theodore Roosevelt:  “How I Love Sagamore Hill”

Theodore Roosevelt by Xiomaro
Theodore Roosevelt by Xiomaro

This solo exhibit features some of the photographs I created of Sagamore Hill, which is President Theodore Roosevelt’s Long Island mansion (also known as the “Summer White House”).  The exhibit is presented by the Oyster Bay Historical Society in partnership with Sagamore Hill National Historic Site and will take place at the Historical Society’s new Angela Koenig Research Center from March 8, 2013 to June 2, 2013.

The photographic collection was created as part of a three-year, $6.2 million dollar structural rehabilitation of the house, which is presently closed to the public.  As a result, the images document the interiors in a historically rare condition:  Sagamore Hill appears much as it did in 1887 when the Roosevelts moved in.  To my knowledge, this is the first significant body of interior photographs since those created in 1966 by Samuel Gottscho, which are now part of the Gottscho-Schleisner Collection at the Library of Congress (though his photographs show the house fully furnished).

Despite the house being substantially vacant, the photographs reveal that TR’s spirit remains permanently in residence.  It is no surprise that on the day before he passed away, TR wistfully commented to his wife Edith “I wonder if you will ever know how I love Sagamore Hill.”

You’re Invited To The Opening Reception:  March 8, 2013

The Opening Reception is on Friday, March 8, 2013 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.  It’s open to the public and free of charge.  Please attend and see if your selections made their way to the walls.  It would be great to meet you all.

But there is more to it than just that.  Sagamore Hill will be celebrating its 50th anniversary as a National Park historic site.  So I will be giving free Gallery Talks during the course of the exhibit, which will be recorded for future broadcast.  I’m also a Guest Speaker as part of the John Gable Lecture series, which is presented by the Friends of Sagamore Hill, a chapter of the Theodore Roosevelt Association.

The exhibit will eventually travel to Harvard College for a year-long exhibit starting in 2014.  Coincidentally, that will be the same year that Ken Burns will be releasing a new PBS documentary titled “The Roosevelts” featuring TR and his presidential cousin Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

So I’m Grateful For Your Input

Traditionally, as the artist, I would solely determine what will get exhibited especially since it is not possible to display all 144 photographs in the collection.  Museum curators are traditionally involved in that process as well.

But the art world can come off as an unapproachable place for those who don’t spend all their time engaged with it.  So I like the idea of bridging that gap to the extent it’s there and giving the public a hand in shaping the exhibit.  I’m sure it has something to do with having spent many years as a performing musician and seminar speaker – I love interacting with an audience.  It’s an ethos that has its detractors though.

I had an art teacher proudly sniff, “I’m an elitist.  I don’t believe art is for everybody.”  She was a good teacher.  But that was one lesson I refused to learn from her.

© 2012 Xiomáro

Hurricane Sandy: Free Photo Restoration

www.xiomaro.com | Contact Me

If you or anyone you know has salvaged an irreplaceable photo damaged during the hurricane, contact me.  I will try to repair it.  Free of charge.  Although this is open to all affected by Sandy, I prefer to assist those with limited financial resources.

Hurricane Sandy Takes Down A Tree
Hurricane Sandy Takes Down A Tree

In the meantime, help make this message viral.  Feel free to forward the link to this blog to anyone you wish.  Realistically, I can only commit to doing one photo for now as it’s a time-consuming process.  So first come, first served.  But I may do more as time allows.  And, if this message does go viral and I get a big response, there are other artists I can try enlisting to help.

Why?

We’re living in the age of instant cell phone photography.  And those images are forever preserved as they get uploaded by the millions to Facebook and other internet destinations.  But there is still an archive of old one-of-a-kind paper photos.  Those images might be one’s only remaining connection to ancestors, a parent, a wedding, a childhood memory or other special occasion.

So damage by water, mud, fire or other accident caused by Sandy can add an additional strain.  There are property losses that can be replaced.  But photos can have a strong emotional attachment.  And if the negatives have also been damaged or were lost long ago, then there is no way of making another copy unless they were previously scanned – in which case, let’s hope they reside in a computer or backup media that has survived the weather.  Water and electronics don’t go well together.

How?

The photo will have to be sent to me so that I can inspect the damage.  In some cases, the photo may be beyond repair.  But, if there is enough there to work with, I will create a high-resolution digital scan of the photo.  From there, I go into a darkroom with Photoshop and a large color-calibrated monitor to essentially perform digital surgery.  Undamaged portions of the photo can be duplicated to replace nearby damaged areas.  But it’s not a mere cut-and-paste job.  An artistic approach is necessary so that everything blends in naturally together.  There may even be areas of the photo that have to be re-created.  Sometimes the process involves micro-surgery where the image is worked on pixel by pixel.

Once the damage is repaired, I can also restore the photo to what it might have looked like when it was first printed.  Photos, like the people represented in them, will age over time.  The print acquires small nicks, tears and scratches.  And the colors may fade especially if the photo was displayed near a window or other location where there was strong light.  Over time, the colors may start to change too.  You may have seen photos from the 1970s that now have a greenish-brown hue.  I can perform a “face lift” to reverse much of that aging.

Upon completion of this work on the digital scan, I will create a new print.  But this is nothing like what your typical office or home printer might produce.  I have a high-end inkjet printer I use for my exhibits.  It has nine ink cartridges with varying shades of blue, red, black and grey ensuring a very precise and detailed image.  And it better.  At the time of this writing, a full set of cartridges goes for about $600.  So the owner of the damaged photo will receive a new, high-quality print as well as a copy of the finished digital file. 

Do What We Can

Hurricane Sandy Uses Tree To Knock Down Electricity, Phone, Internet and Cable TV
Hurricane Sandy Uses Tree To Knock Down Electricity, Phone, Internet and Cable TV

I was scheduled to fly out of New York last week to attend the opening of my exhibit, “Weir Was Here,” at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.  The exhibit features my photographs of J. Alden Weir’s house and art studio at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut.  Weir is one of the founders of American Impressionism and the University has a significant collection of his work.

The exhibit and itinerary had been in the works for many months.  My photographs had arrived at the gallery space the week before and will remain on exhibit until January 2013.  But I was to do a promotional visit to Provo:  a radio interview in the morning, a Gallery Talk, meetings with the curator and staff, a private viewing of selected art work from the museum’s collection and visits to local media and galleries.

But Sandy had other plans and cancelled all flights – along with the electricity, heat, cell phone service, internet service, mass transit and gas stations.  Although I’m a five minute walk from Hempstead Harbor, I’m located at the highest point in my county.  So no damage was suffered by water and, thankfully, the wind did not throw any trees or limbs in our way.

Unfortunately, a great many people did not fare as well.  Long Beach, lower Manhattan and Breezy Point are just some of the areas in New York that have been hit hard.  Bridgeport and Norwalk in Connecticut are flooded and, of course, many places in New Jersey have been destroyed.  Although the Northeast has garnered the most media coverage, there are also places like Haiti – still reeling from the 2010 earthquake – that suffered extensive flooding and deaths.

If you’re like me, then you’re not a celebrity, politician or millionaire.  We don’t have the resources provided by a fan base, a government or wealthy connections.  But we can each do small things that cumulatively have a big impact.  Rather than let Sandy rob me of the joy from a promotional tour, I thought I would make the best of the situation and use the resources I do have — in art — to lend someone a hand.

What You Can Do Right Now

> If you can repost this blog to your social media networks, it will help get the word out to those who can benefit from my offer.  Depending on what link you used to get here, you may see a “Share This” button below.

> If you are able to provide the same service as me, feel free to use my blog post as a template for getting the word out to your own network.

> If you have other suggestions on what we can do to help others affected by Sandy, please leave a reply below so that everyone can benefit from your ideas.  Feel free to include links to private and governmental organizations that can provide assistance.

> If you have become motivated to do something to help someone, please leave a reply below.  Your story may encourage someone else to do the same.

> Click “Follow” on the bottom right for periodic updates.  You can also enter your email address on the upper left (look for the “Email Subscription” heading).

© 2012 Xiomáro

Press Release: “Weir Was Here – Secret Rooms, Doors and Windows” On Exhibit at Brigham Young University

www.xiomaro.com | Contact Me

“Weir Was Here – Secret Rooms, Doors and Windows” will be on exhibit at Brigham Young University’s Harold B. Lee Library, Auditorium Gallery, Level 1, North Campus Drive, in Provo, Utah, from November 1, 2012, to January 23, 2013.  Gallery hours are Monday to Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

This solo exhibit, by New York artist Xiomáro (pronounced “SEE-oh-MAH-ro”), features photographs from the first artistic collection documenting the beauty and textures of the interiors of Julian Alden Weir’s house and studio.  Weir was one of the founders of American Impressionism, and his house and studio are part of what is now Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut.

"Weir Was Here: Secret Rooms, Doors and Windows" on exhibit at Brigham Young University
“Weir Was Here: Secret Rooms, Doors and Windows” on exhibit at Brigham Young University

Xiomáro will give a Gallery Talk on November 1 from 3:00 p.m. to 3:50 p.m. at 1131 HBLL Special Collections Lecture Room, Harold B. Lee Library, at BYU.  The artist will give away free 4″ x 6″ souvenir prints to all in attendance and will also randomly select one or two people to receive a different, larger print.  Admission to the exhibit and to the Gallery Talk is free of charge.

The photographs have been extensively exhibited in Connecticut as well as at the Washington, DC, office of Senator Joseph Lieberman who co-sponsored the bill to include Weir Farm as part of the National Park system.  The collection arrives at BYU just as the University’s exhibit of paintings – “The Weir Family, 1820-1920:  Expanding the Traditions of American Art” – travels to museums in Connecticut and North Carolina.  Julian Alden Weir, his father Robert and his older brother John helped to shape American art for nearly a century.

Xiomáro’s exhibit presents 29 large photographic prints measuring 17″ x 25″ allowing for immersive views of these rarely seen rooms, doors, windows and other distinguishing characteristics of the interiors – unadorned but, at once, stark, rustic and ethereal.  “The images add a sense of intimacy with Weir’s life,” said Xiomáro.  “His art becomes further humanized because the same eyes and hands that painted works of Impressionism unlocked the doors and opened the shutters seen in the photographs.”

This unique photographic record was commissioned by the National Park Service as part of a major rehabilitation and restoration of Julian Alden Weir’s house and painting studio.  By 2013, the interiors will be fully furnished and significantly changed from how they appear now.  So the photographs offer a rare peek of what lies within as the interiors are empty for the first time in at least 140 years.  “Their vacant state enabled me to draw attention to details and features that might otherwise go unnoticed in a fully furnished setting,” explained Xiomáro.

The artist also titled each photograph with a line of his original poetry.  When each photo is viewed in sequence together with its corresponding title, a narrative unfolds about Julian Alden Weir, his artistic contemporaries and successors, and his homestead’s continuing legacy as both a National Park and as an incubator for new talent through its internationally respected Artist-in-Residence program.  “Before turning to photography,” explained Xiomáro, “I had an extensive career in music.  So I couldn’t help but to incorporate my love for lyrics and poetry into the series.”

More information about the exhibit and Xiomáro is available at www.xiomaro.com and http://net.lib.byu.edu/art/current.html.  For more information about Weir Farm National Historic Site, visit www.nps.gov/wefa.  All prints on exhibit are available for sale and help fund continuing exhibits of the “Weir Was Here” collection.

Press Release: Weir Farm Exhibit Makes Rounds from Senator Lieberman to G&B Community Cultural Center

www.xiomaro.com | Contact Me

The first artistic collection of photographs documenting the interiors of the major historic buildings at Weir Farm National Historic Site will be on display at G&B Community Cultural Center in Wilton, October 13 to November 10, after a year of exhibition at many legislative venues including the Washington, DC, office of Senator Joseph Lieberman.

The public is invited to attend the opening reception, free of charge, at G&B Community Cultural Center in Wilton on Saturday, October 13, from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.  Coffee is provided courtesy of Starbucks in Wilton.

Weir Was Here - North Window Overlooking Studio
Weir Was Here – North Window Overlooking Studio

A selection of the photographic collection entitled “Weir Was Here – Secret Rooms, Doors and Windows” was first exhibited at Weir Farm last January.  In March, Senator Joseph Lieberman (who sponsored Weir Farm’s National Park status) had another selection of photographs installed at his Washington, DC, office where they will remain until the end of the year following his retirement.

Additional photographs are on display at Congressman Jim Himes’ Bridgeport and Stamford offices. Other exhibits are being planned with Senator Richard Blumenthal, Governor Dannel Malloy and Stamford Mayor Michael Pavia.

“The support for these photographs reflects the importance of Weir Farm to the history and culture of Connecticut,” explains Xiomáro (SEE-oh-MAH-ro), Weir Farm’s Visiting Artist and a former Artist-in-Residence who created the images for the park.

The unique photographic record was commissioned by the National Park Service as part of a major rehabilitation and restoration of Julian Alden Weir’s house and painting studio and Mahonri Young’s sculpture studio.  By 2013, the interiors will be fully furnished and significantly changed from how they appear now.  So the photographs offer a rare peek of what lies within.  Weir was a leading figure in American art and the development of American Impressionism.  He acquired the property in 1882 and his daughter, painter Dorothy Weir Young, and her husband, sculptor Mahonri Young, continued working and living on the farm after Weir’s death.

The exhibit at G&B Community Cultural Center is unique in that it will present the greatest number of photographs including 12 that have been printed for the first time.  These 17″ x 25″ photographs are also larger than any previously exhibited and will be presented unframed.  As Xiomáro elaborates, “viewers can now see the photographs as I see them at my studio – without any of the barriers introduced by framing.  The glass, its inherently green tinge, its reflective glare and the matting are layers that separate one from the surface finish of the print and interfere with its original colors and tones.  I want the viewers’ experience of the photographs to be as intimate as the subject matter of the images.”

“Weir Was Here – Secret Rooms, Doors and Windows” is on exhibit at G&B Community Cultural Center, 49 New Street, Wilton, Connecticut 06897 from October 13 to November 10, 2012.  The viewing schedule is Monday to Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Admission is free. More information is available at http://www.xiomaro.com, where the public can register for the opening reception.  Registration is not required, but helpful for planning purposes.

For more information about Weir Farm National Historic Site, visit http://www.nps.gov/wefa. Sales of prints will benefit G&B Community Cultural Center, a non-profit organization, and will help fund continuing exhibits of the “Weir Was Here” collection.