“Long Island at War” Exhibit Features Photographs From Xiomáro

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Long Island at War
Long Island at War

Photographs created by Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro) will be included in the Long Island Museum’s large scale exhibit Long Island at War:  Battle Front and Home Front, from May 23 to December 29, 2014, in Stony Brook, New York.

He is the only contemporary artist to be included in an exhibit featuring over 200 artifacts, paintings, and historical photographs drawn from many prominent museum and private collections.

Xiomáro’s photographs from the William Floyd Estate in Mastic and Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill in Oyster Bay were selected by the museum to visually unify the exhibit’s six sections on each of America’s military engagements.

The artist created the photographs under commissions by the National Park Service.  William Floyd, who signed the Declaration of Independence and fought in the Revolutionary War under George Washington, will be prominently featured with photographs of his house in Mastic, his rarely seen ceremonial sword and the Chippendale desk from which he worked.  His descendants’ involvement in subsequent wars is also included.  A photograph of a Civil War recruitment poster represents his grandson’s service in the Union Army.  William Floyd Nichols’ World War II jacket and other memorabilia are displayed in another photograph taken in one of the dining rooms of the house in Mastic, which is open to the public as part of Fire Island National Seashore.

Civil War Recruitment Poster
Civil War Recruitment Poster

For the Spanish-American War, Long Island’s other National Park comes into view with an imposing photograph of Theodore Roosevelt resplendent in his Rough Rider uniform.  Xiomáro created the close-up from a painting hanging in Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

Xio is a nationally exhibited artist who uses photography to breathe life into iconic American figures.  His work has been covered by The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Fine Art Connoisseur and many other national media outlets.  He began as an Artist-in-Residence at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut, where he continues as a Visiting Artist.  His solo exhibit at Harvard University features his Sagamore Hill collection.

An opportunity to delve deeper into the William Floyd and Sagamore Hill photographs will be offered to the public through an Artist Talk and Q&A that Xiomáro will be presenting on Sunday, October 19, 2014 from 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm at the Long Island Museum’s Gillespie Room located in the Carriage Museum Building.

Long Island at War is the first major museum exhibition centering on the region’s many significant and continuing connections to American military history.  Long Island has been a crucial and often unsung player in nearly every American war.  From Brooklyn to Montauk, generations of Long Island men and women have served and sacrificed for the country’s cause, and the region has been essential to the industrial supply, combat training, and coastal defense of the nation.  The region’s military role has been vital, multifaceted, and ever-present:  the Battle of Long Island in 1776, the essential war products created by Grumman Corporation and other Long Island-based companies in World War II, the solemn resting place provided to today’s fallen military heroes at Calverton National Cemetery.

The Long Island Museum is a Smithsonian Affiliate and is located at 1200 Route 25A, Stony Brook, NY  11790.  A free e-book containing some of Xiomáro’s work is available at xiomaro.com.

Harvard Photo Exhibit Features Rarely Seen Views of Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill

 

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Harvard University’s Lamont/Pusey Library opens the New Year with selections from the photographic series Theodore Roosevelt – “How I Love Sagamore Hill” by Xiomáro.  The New York artist was commissioned by Theodore Roosevelt's Sagamore Hill by Xiomaro 003the National Park Service to photograph the interiors of the president’s “Summer Whitehouse” at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

The 26 photographs featured in the free exhibit will remain on view at the library from January 26 to December 31, 2014.  An opening reception, artist talk and gallery tour are being scheduled.  A limited edition photo e-Book, based on the series, can be downloaded for free at www.xiomaro.com.

Xiomáro’s photographs show the house in a historically rare condition:  the 23 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant as part of a three-year, $7.2 million structural rehabilitation.  The last significant body of interior photographs, albeit fully-furnished, is at the Library of Congress and was created in 1966 by Samuel Gottscho.

Xiomáro’s exhibit is timely in that filmmaker Ken Burns, a Harvard graduate, is releasing The Roosevelts, a new PBS documentary that explores the political dynasty of TR, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt.  The exhibit is also unique in that Xiomáro’s photographs do not solely focus on TR, but also draw attention to his wife, children and servants to give a sense of what life was like in the household.  “Even though the rooms are nearly vacant, the photographs reveal the imposing character of America’s 26th president and the more intimate domestic nature of his family,” explained the artist.  “Some of these nuances are overwhelmed by a room’s furnishings or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers.”

Xiomáro is a nationally exhibited artist whose work has been covered by The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Fine Art Connoisseur and other media outlets.  He is known for using photography to draw attention to historical sites where American figures lived and worked to pursue their vision.  Other projects with the National Park Service include Old Mastic House at Fire Island National Seashore (home of William Floyd, a signer of the Declaration of Independence) and the farmhouse and art studios at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut (home of both J. Alden Weir, a founder of American impressionist painting, and Mahonri Young, a sculptor of the Ashcan School).  “My goal is that, after experiencing these collections, viewers will feel compelled to visit the parks where they, too, can examine these leaders and explore the ideas that shaped our culture,” explains the artist.

Rarely seen dual peacocks in wallpaper
Rarely seen dual peacocks in wallpaper
TR's nearly vacant Library
TR’s nearly vacant Library

New York City’s African Burial Ground National Monument Exhibits Photographic Memorial of Little Known Slave Cemetery During Black History Month

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New York City’s African Burial Ground National Monument celebrates Black History Month with the photographic exhibit The Other Side – Charles, Caesar, Harry, Sam, Pompey, Lon and Isaac by New York artist Xiomáro.

The Other Side is the first photographic series centering on the burial ground of the little-known slaves from the William Floyd Estate in Mastic, Long Island, which is now a National Park unit of Fire Island National Seashore.  Floyd signed the Declaration of Independence and served with George Washington.

The series is a spiritual memorial of these slaves and seeks to dignify them as individuals.  Separated by a white wooden fence, their simple, year-less crucifixes bearing singular generic slave names are juxtaposed with the elaborate individualized tombstones of the Floyd cemetery.

Slavery’s complicated history was not limited to the south and was economically integral to some of the Founding Fathers.  Over time, Floyd’s descendants decreased their slave holdings and his grandson enlisted in the Union army with other men that he recruited.

The Other Side

The photographs were created by Xiomáro (SEE-oh-MAH-ro), a nationally exhibited artist whose work has been covered by The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Fine Art Connoisseur and many other media outlets.  He is known for using photography to draw attention to important historical sites.  Other projects with the National Park Service include Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill mansion in Oyster Bay (on exhibit at Harvard University) and the farmhouse and art studios at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut (home of both J. Alden Weir, a founder of American impressionist painting, and Mahonri Young, a sculptor of the Ashcan School).  “My goal is that, after experiencing these collections, viewers will visit the parks to better understand our history, especially lesser known locations like the William Floyd Estate and its slave burial ground,” explains the artist.

The 10 large photographs featured in the free exhibit will remain on view at African Burial Ground National Monument, 290 Broadway in Lower Manhattan, from February 1 to 31, 2014.  A free artist talk and mini exhibit will be held at Oyster Bay Historical Society, 20 Summit Street, Oyster Bay, on Sunday, February 9, 2:00 pm, and a free limited edition photo e-book, based on the series, can be downloaded at www.xiomaro.com.

TR’s Sagamore Hill Visits FDR’s Hyde Park

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The National Park Service in Hyde Park opens the new year with selections from the photographic series Theodore Roosevelt – “How I Love Sagamore Hill” by Xiomáro.  The New York artist, also known as “X”, was commissioned by the National Park Service to photograph the interiors of the president’s house at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.  The series was created during the removal of the mansion’s contents and furnishings as part of a three-year, $7.2 million structural rehabilitation.  A limited edition photo eBook, based on the exhibit, can be downloaded for free at www.xiomaro.com.logo_rova

The two large photographs featured in the free exhibit will remain on view at the Wallace Center from January 6 to February 22, 2014.  The images are drawn from a more extensive exhibit on display at Harvard University to coincide with filmmaker Ken Burns’ 2014 release of The Roosevelts, which explores the political dynasty of TR, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt.  The exhibit at Wallace closes with a free Community Photography Workshop on Saturday, February 22, from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm.  X will present five principles for improving one’s photography in his talk “Learning to Look.”

Theodore Roosevelt's North Room
Theodore Roosevelt’s North Room

X’s photographs show the house in a historically rare condition:  the 23 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant.  Yet, “so much about the occupants is revealed by the house,” explained the artist.  The image of TR’s North Room, where he met dignitaries, and the Master Bedroom, known by his children as “Mother’s Room,” reveal not only just the imposing character of America’s 26th president, but also the more intimate domestic nature of his family.  “Some of these details,” continued X, “can easily be overwhelmed by a room’s furnishings or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers.”

X is a nationally exhibited artist whose work has been covered by The New York TimesThe Huffington Post, Fine Art Connoisseur and other media outlets.  He is known for using photography to draw attention to historical sites where American figures lived and worked to pursue their vision.  Other commissions with the National Park Service include Old Mastic House at Fire Island National Seashore (home of William Floyd, a signer of the Declaration of Independence) and the farmhouse and art studios at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut (home of J. Alden Weir, a founder of American impressionist painting).  “My goal is that, after experiencing these collections, viewers will feel compelled to visit the parks where they, too, can examine these leaders and explore the ideas that shaped our culture,” explains the artist.

Sea Cliff’s K. DiResta Collective Exhibits “City Grids, Country Patterns” Photos

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Roslyn Heights artist, Xiomáro, presents his new photographic art series, City Grids, Country Patterns, at Sea Cliff’s K. DiResta Collective from October 1 to November 1, 2013.

New York City - View from Governors Island
New York City – View from Governors Island

The 12 photographs in the series juxtapose views of contemporary New York City skyscrapers with those of J. Alden Weir’s historically preserved Connecticut home and grounds now known as Weir Farm National Historic SiteWeir was part of an eminent family art dynasty and a founder of American Impressionism whose works now hang at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Each photograph is a close-up so that the series transitions from modern grids to organic patterns, which highlights the abstract beauty within each subject.

“There’s a tradition of artists, like J. Alden Weir, who lived and painted in the country, but made their reputations in the cultural world and art market of New York City,” explains Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro).

Peeper in Marsh - Weir Farm National Historic Site
Peeper in Marsh – Weir Farm National Historic Site

Xiomáro is a nationally exhibited artist who is frequently commissioned by the National Park Service to artistically photograph historical sites.  His other collections include Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill mansion in Oyster Bay, which was covered by the New York Times and will be exhibited at Harvard University next year.

His photographs of the William Floyd house in Mastic, Long Island, are on exhibit at New York City’s Fraunces Tavern Museum.  His collections can be seen and purchased at his website, www.xiomaro.com, where a free souvenir print from the City Grids, Country Patterns exhibit is available.

Xiomaro’s City Grids, Country Patterns opens on October 1 at K. DiResta Collective, 212 Sea Cliff Avenue, Sea Cliff, and remains on view until November 1, 2013.  The photographs complement the line of geometric jewelry designed by gallery owner Kathleen DiResta-Roth who also oversees the Sea Cliff Council of the Arts.

Admission to the gallery is free and hours are Tuesday to Saturday from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm.  All other days and hours are by appointment by calling (917) 767-9216.

Fraunces Tavern® Museum Presents “William Floyd’s House of Revolution”

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William Floyd's House of Revolution at Fraunces Tavern Museum
William Floyd’s House of Revolution at Fraunces Tavern Museum

“William Floyd’s House of Revolution,” a new photographic exhibit by New York artist Xiomáro, opens on July 4 at Fraunces Tavern® Museum (54 Pearl Street, New York City) and remains on view until December 1, 2013.  The exhibit includes documents and other artifacts pertaining to Floyd and his great grandson, Frederick Tallmadge.

The collection of 18 photographs, on display in the Museum’s Messick Gallery, artistically documents the home of William Floyd, an American revolutionary and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.  The home, known as The Old Mastic House, is located in Mastic, Long Island, and is part of the Fire Island National Seashore.

National Park Service Commission

The photographs were commissioned by the National Park Service and present interior views and perspectives that visitors to the sprawling 25 room house are not likely to see.  The photographs also include rare close-ups of Floyd’s signature and personal items such as his snuff box and traveling “medicine” chest that actually carried liquor.

William Floyd's Signature
William Floyd’s Signature

Together with fellow rebels like George Washington, Floyd served in the first Continental Congress in 1774.  By the late 1770s, the British occupied Long Island and Floyd escaped to Connecticut.  Floyd returned to a ransacked house, which he restored to receive visitors such as Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and other notable guests.

Evolution of a House and Country

Remarkably, Old Mastic House was continuously occupied by Floyd’s descendants up until 1976 when it was donated to the National Park Service.  So the photographs also show how both the house and the new nation grew, expanded and evolved together through history.  Like America’s motto – e pluribus unum – the house stands as one unified historical structure comprised of many evolving styles in architecture, furnishings, design and technology.

The Fraunces Tavern® Museum, a complex of five buildings with nine galleries, is where George Washington bade farewell to the officers of the Continental Army.  The museum houses an extensive collection of Revolutionary War era artifacts.  Free guided tours are available on the weekends.

William Floyd’s Old Mastic House is located at 245 Park Drive, Mastic Beach, Long Island and is part of Fire Island National Seashore.  In addition to offering free house tours , visitors can avail themselves of Fire Island’s dynamic barrier island beaches, which offer solitude, camaraderie and spiritual renewal.

See The Photos, Then Visit The Parks

Old Mastic House
Old Mastic House

Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro), is a nationally exhibited artist who uses photography to interpret historical sites within the National Park Service where iconic American figures lived and worked to pursue their vision.  He began as an Artist-in-Residence at Weir Farm National Historic Site in Wilton, Connecticut, which is the homestead of Julian Alden Weir, one of the founders of American Impressionism.  He continues his relationship with the park as a Visiting Artist.  His other photographic commissions from the National Park Service include Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill mansion in Oyster Bay, which will be exhibited at Harvard University next year.

“My goal is that viewers of these photographs will feel compelled to visit the parks where they, too, can examine these leaders and explore the ideas that shaped our culture.  Experiencing our heritage and open spaces also ensures their preservation and conservation,” explains the artist.  His collections can be seen and purchased at his website:  www.xiomaro.com.  A free 60 page eBook and a 4″ x 6″ souvenir print are also available there.

Press Release: Photo Exhibit at Mayor Pavia’s Gallery Features Rarely Seen Views of Weir Farm

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J. Alden Weir's Painting Studio, Wilton, Connecticut
J. Alden Weir’s Painting Studio, Wilton, Connecticut

The Mayor’s Gallery in Stamford presents “Weir Was Here – Secret Rooms, Doors and Windows,” a photographic essay by Xiomaro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro).   The free exhibit runs until April 30, 2013 at Mayor Michael Pavia’s office at 888 Washington Boulevard, 10th floor, in Stamford, on weekdays from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.

The exhibit presents 38 images, the largest number ever exhibited, from the first artistic photographic collection documenting the beauty and textures of the key historical structures at Weir Farm National Historic Site located in Wilton and Ridgefield, which have never been seen by the general public.  The homestead was continuously occupied by artists starting with Julian Alden Weir, one of the founders of American Impressionism, and including Mahonri Young, a sculptor and painter of the Ashcan School.

Congressman Jim Himes, whose office is just down the hall from the Mayor’s Gallery, remarked that “the photographs are almost haunting.  You stare at them and there are just multiple levels of things that you see.  In fact, I liked it so much that for some time now I’ve had Xiomaro’s [work] hanging here in my Stamford office.”

Lina Morielli, the curator of the gallery, agreed that Xiomaro “managed to capture something about the essence of what was going on there.  There is a ghostlike quality.”  Morielli explained that although the images are all digital photographs, “some of them are very painterly.  They are composed in a way that makes you think that they could almost be something else.”

This fall the buildings will open to the public with the interiors fully furnished and significantly changed from how they appear now.  So the photographs offer a rare peek of what lies within these vacant rooms.  Xiomaro uses photography to draw attention to historical sites where American figures lived and worked to pursue their vision.  Other projects with the National Park Service include President Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill mansion, which will be exhibited at Harvard University next year.  “My goal is that after experiencing these collections, urban viewers will feel compelled to visit the parks where they, too, can examine these leaders and explore the ideas that shaped our culture,” explains the artist.  “As a product of New York City, I can attest to the inspiring and introspective effect these iconic, local places can have on one’s spirit.” 

The artist produced a video with commentary from Congressman Jim Himes, whose office is next door to Mayor Pavia, and Lina Morielli, the curator of the Mayor’s Gallery.

 

 

The artist is offering a free 4” x 6” souvenir print from the collection until the close of the exhibit on April 30, which can be obtained at his website www.xiomaro.com.  For information about visiting Weir Farm, go to www.nps.gov/wefa.

Press Release: Oyster Bay Photo Exhibit Features Rarely Seen Views of Theodore Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill

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The Oyster Bay Historical Society opens its spring exhibition with the fine art photographic series Theodore Roosevelt – “How I Love Sagamore Hill” by Xiomáro (pronounced SEE-oh-MAH-ro), a Long Island artist. Xiomáro photographed the interiors of the President’s house at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site. The collection of over 140 photographs was created last year during the removal of the mansion’s contents and furnishings as part of a three-year, $6.2 million structural rehabilitation by the National Parks Service. The debut exhibit features 20 photographs from the collection with each image uniquely titled so that a poetic narrative unfolds about TR and his household. The photographs remain on view at the Society’s Koenig Center through June 2. The exhibit then travels to Harvard University for a year-long display with plans to invite documentary filmmaker Ken Burns as a speaker.

Reception and Free Photo eBook

A catered reception with live music and a drawing to win a print from the exhibit is scheduled for Friday, March 8, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Koenig Center, 20 Summit Street, Oyster Bay. Admission to the reception is free of charge. The artist is also offering a free photo eBook, based on the exhibit, at his website: www.xiomaro.com. The website includes information on viewing hours and a series of free gallery talks presented by the artist.

Rarely Seen Views

Theodore Roosevelt's famed "North Room" by Xiomaro
Theodore Roosevelt’s famed “North Room” by Xiomaro

The photographs show the house in a historically rare condition in that the 22 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant. Yet, “so much of the Roosevelt family’s personality is revealed by the house,” said Xiomáro, “even though its occupants – and now most of its contents – are absent from the premises.” Images from the exhibition reveal not just the imposing character of America’s 26th President, but also the more intimate domestic nature of his family, such as the textured sconce globes of Edith Roosevelt’s drawing room. “Some of these details,” continued Xiomáro, “may have previously been overwhelmed by a room’s furnishing, or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers.”  The artist produced a video with commentary from staff at the Historical Society and Sagamore Hill as well as from Elizabeth Roosevelt, a descendant of the President.

Visit The Parks

Xiomáro uses photography to draw attention to historical sites where American figures lived and worked to pursue their vision. Other projects with the National Parks Service include William Floyd’s mansion at Fire Island National Seashore’s Old Mastic House (home of William Floyd, a signer of the Declaration of Independence) and Weir Farm National Historic Site’s buildings in Connecticut (home of J. Alden Weir, a founder of American impressionist painting). “My goal is that, after experiencing these collections, viewers will feel compelled to visit the parks where they, too, can examine these leaders and explore the ideas that shaped our culture,” explains the artist.

Drawing Room (a/k/a “Edith’s Room") by Xiomaro

Mother's Room - Winter Sunset by Xiomaro

Press Release: How I Love Sagamore Hill – A Photographic Collection by Xiomáro

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Philip Blocklyn
The Oyster Bay Historical Society and Koenig Center
(516) 922-5032 | obhsdirector@optonline.net

How I Love Sagamore Hill:  A Photographic Collection by Xiomáro
An exhibition organized by Xiomáro Art Studio in partnership with
Sagamore Hill National Historic Site and the Oyster Bay Historical Society

Theodore Roosevelt's Sagamore Hill by Xiomaro 003
Click The Image To Get A Free Photo e-Book

March 8 to June 2, 2013
Oyster Bay Historical Society’s Koenig Center | 20 Summit Street, Oyster Bay, New York 11771

Opening Reception on Friday, March 8, 6-8 pm | Light refreshments and live music | Free admission
Attendees will be entered into a drawing to win a free print
Click here for map and directions

Free Gallery Talks | 2:00 to 3:00 p.m
Saturday, March 16 | Sunday, April 14 | Saturday, May 18
The Koenig Center, 20 Summit Street, Oyster Bay NY
Attendees will be entered into a drawing to win a free print

The Oyster Bay Historical Society will open its spring exhibition with a reception on Friday March 8, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm at the Koenig Center at 20 Summit Street in Oyster Bay. How I Love Sagamore Hill exhibits a selection of photographs by Xiomáro, who photographed the interior of the President’s House at Sagamore Hill as it stood essentially vacant after the removal of its contents and furnishings in 2012 as part of a three-year, $6.2 million structural rehabilitation. The exhibition, presented in partnership with Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, will remain on view at the Society’s Koenig Center through June 2.

During the winter of 2012, Sagamore Hill National Historic Site commissioned Xiomáro to create an artistic photographic collection of Theodore Roosevelt’s Oyster Bay house in a historically rare condition—appearing much as it did when first occupied in 1887—following the removal of the twenty-two-room house’s furnishings, rugs, trophy heads, library, artwork, and other contents. A total of over one hundred images document rooms on all three floors, including the first floor’s North Room, dining room, pantry, drawing room, hall and library.

“So much of the Roosevelt family’s personality is revealed by the house,” said Xiomáro, “even though its occupants—and now most of its contents—are absent from the premises.” Images from the exhibition reveal not just the imposing character of America’s 26th President, but also the more intimate domestic nature of the Roosevelt family of Sagamore Hill, such as the textured sconce globes of Edith Roosevelt’s drawing room. “Some of these details,” continued Xiomáro, “may have previously been overwhelmed by a room’s furnishing, or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers.”

The Oyster Bay Historical Society is open Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm, Saturdays from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm, and Sundays from 1:00 to 4:00 pm. Admission to the exhibition, opening reception, and gallery talks is free. Donations are welcomed. For information, please call the Society at 516-922-5032 or visit oysterbayhistorical.org

The Winner of the Theodore Roosevelt Photo Art Exhibit Selection

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Video Announcement of the Winner
Video Announcement of the Winner

“You think you’re going to
win a Special Edition print?”

Recently, I gave an open invitation to help select photos for my exhibit at the Oyster Bay Historical Society, March 8 to June 2, titled “Theodore Roosevelt: How I Love Sagamore Hill.”

The idea was to view an online portfolio of images I created of President Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill mansion and to submit favorites.  All participants get a free 4″ x 6″ souvenir print of the exhibit poster and a thank you on my website.

I’ll be writing more about what people selected and how they reacted to the photographs.  But, in the meantime, I hope you will enjoy this video where I randomly chose a winner to receive a free 8.5″ x 11″ Special Edition print of their choice.  Click my photo or click this link to watch.