Weir Farm – Yellow Squash

April showers bring May flowers…and vegetables. Movies have scenes that end up, as they say, on the cutting room floor and don’t get included in the final film. Likewise, there are photographs that I intended to include in my book Weir Farm National Historic Site (Arcadia Publishing), but had to be cut due to spaceContinue reading “Weir Farm – Yellow Squash”

1950 Philco AM Radio (Model 51-631)

For a time, my father had a small radio and television repair shop. We were living in Brooklyn, but I think his place of business was in Manhattan. In his day, working with radios and television sets was on the cutting edge of consumer technology. It’s akin to today’s programmers working on the latest appsContinue reading “1950 Philco AM Radio (Model 51-631)”

Planting Fields Arboretum

Well, this certainly does not look like a street though I suppose the shadows do suggest the paths of several intersecting roads. But I am using “street photography” broadly here. Much of my work is created for commissions by the U.S. National Park Service (NPS). That work is methodically planned out and involves an assortmentContinue reading “Planting Fields Arboretum”

Weir Farm – Library Bookcase

World Book Day was established in 1995 by the United Nations (U.N.) to promote reading and publishing. It also celebrates the importance of copyright as the legal protection of an author’s written work. It is celebrated on April 23. The date was initially proposed to recognize the death of Miguel de Cervantes, best known forContinue reading “Weir Farm – Library Bookcase”

Kissimmee Billy Strand

April 22 is Earth Day, an internationally-recognized annual event that began in 1970. I was invited by the U.S. National Park Service to spend a month at Florida’s Big Cypress National Preserve as its Artist-in-Residence. While there, I created a series of photographs to artistically document the invasive species issue that is plaguing the environmentContinue reading “Kissimmee Billy Strand”

Old Mastic House

April 13 marks the birth of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826). He was a Founding Father, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and the owner of Monticello, a southern plantation worked by slaves. There are, of course, many other aspects of his life that have made him a complex historical figure. Up north, thereContinue reading “Old Mastic House”

Cathedral of St. John the Divine

For some, Easter is not complete without attending a church service. For the Episcopal church in Morningside Heights, commonly known as St. John’s, that sense of incompleteness has lingered for well over a century. Construction of the church began in 1892 and the first service was held in 1899. And, yet, the structure remains unfinished.Continue reading “Cathedral of St. John the Divine”

Street Photography: 200 West 14th Street

It’s been a while since I have posted any street photography work.  It’s easy to get backed up especially as I was starting a new National Park Service commission that gave rise to some artistic and technical and challenges.  Now that so much of the world is under some sort of quarantine, the commission isContinue reading “Street Photography: 200 West 14th Street”

Big Ben’s Rainbow

I was in London to meet with the cultural attaché of the U.S. Embassy to the United Kingdom. He expressed interest in presenting a solo exhibition of my photography at a new building that was to be constructed at Nine Elms. While there, I also visited the National Poetry Library to explore the possibility ofContinue reading “Big Ben’s Rainbow”

Quabbin Reservoir

April is a rainy month. And that got me thinking about my photographs of the New England National Scenic Trail, which is more commonly known as simply the New England Trail. The collection was commissioned by the U.S. National Park Service, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and the Connecticut Forest and Park Association. I always chuckleContinue reading “Quabbin Reservoir”