Street Photography: 210 West 14th Street

In a previous blog post, I described my experience revisiting West 14th Street, an area I frequented many years ago when I worked in the music industry.  Although the area has changed, I photographed a residential building — number 200 — that stood on West 14th for over one hundred years. As I continued walkingContinue reading “Street Photography: 210 West 14th Street”

Old Mastic House

April 13 marks the birth of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826). He was a Founding Father, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and the owner of Monticello, a southern plantation worked by slaves. There are, of course, many other aspects of his life that have made him a complex historical figure. Up north, thereContinue reading “Old Mastic House”

Cathedral of St. John the Divine

For some, Easter is not complete without attending a church service. For the Episcopal church in Morningside Heights, commonly known as St. John’s, that sense of incompleteness has lingered for well over a century. Construction of the church began in 1892 and the first service was held in 1899. And, yet, the structure remains unfinished.Continue reading “Cathedral of St. John the Divine”

Street Photography: 200 West 14th Street

It’s been a while since I have posted any street photography work.  It’s easy to get backed up especially as I was starting a new National Park Service commission that gave rise to some artistic and technical and challenges.  Now that so much of the world is under some sort of quarantine, the commission isContinue reading “Street Photography: 200 West 14th Street”

Big Ben’s Rainbow

I was in London to meet with the cultural attaché of the U.S. Embassy to the United Kingdom. He expressed interest in presenting a solo exhibition of my photography at a new building that was to be constructed at Nine Elms. While there, I also visited the National Poetry Library to explore the possibility ofContinue reading “Big Ben’s Rainbow”

“The Father of his Country”

March brings an unusual confluence of poetry and politics. On March 4, 1789, the U.S. Constitution came into effect as the governing document for the newly formed nation. March 21 is recognized as World Poetry Day and March 24 marks 138 years since the death of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-82), who was one of 19thContinue reading ““The Father of his Country””

“Home is the Starting Place”

I was reminded of this photograph after seeing that St. Patrick’s Day is coming up on March 17. It’s an image that is published on page 30 of my book Weir Farm National Historic Site (Arcadia Publishing). My book tells the story of Julian Alden Weir (1852-1919), who is one of the founders of American Impressionist painting.Continue reading ““Home is the Starting Place””

Attic Clock

Don’t forget that on March 8, all the clocks will “spring forward” for daylight saving time. The time will move ahead by one hour and we’ll lose an hour of sleep. But we’ll gain extra sunlight and the pleasure of knowing that spring is near – it arrives on March 19 to be exact. TheContinue reading “Attic Clock”

Longfellow’s Smoking Jacket

To celebrate Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s birthday on February 27, I thought I would present an image that has never been displayed in public or printed before. Indeed, even the subject of the photograph is a very rare sight. One of the things I enjoy about being commissioned by the National Park Service, is the opportunityContinue reading “Longfellow’s Smoking Jacket”

Fort Warren Demilune

In working with the National Park Service, I get to visit many interesting places. The experience is also an educational adventure. I never heard of a “Demilune” before until I was commissioned to photograph Fort Warren and other sites at Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. The fort is a National Historic Landmark dating backContinue reading “Fort Warren Demilune”