Street Photography: 210 West 14th Street

In a previous blog post, I described my experience revisiting West 14th Street, an area I frequented many years ago when I worked in the music industry.  Although the area has changed, I photographed a residential building — number 200 — that stood on West 14th for over one hundred years. As I continued walkingContinue reading “Street Photography: 210 West 14th Street”

Old Mastic House

April 13 marks the birth of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826). He was a Founding Father, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and the owner of Monticello, a southern plantation worked by slaves. There are, of course, many other aspects of his life that have made him a complex historical figure. Up north, thereContinue reading “Old Mastic House”

The Suffragents: How Women Used Men to Get the Vote

March is Women’s History Month, and 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote. The movement to win voting rights for women (commonly known as the women’s suffrage movement) had its roots in Seneca Falls, New York, at a convention heldContinue reading “The Suffragents: How Women Used Men to Get the Vote”

Washington’s Master Bedroom – Vignette

March 8 is International Women’s Day and 2020 marks the suffrage centennial. So I dedicate this photograph to the memory of Theodosia Ford. Here’s why. If you were to ask the average person to name famous people from the American Revolutionary War, you will probably hear George Washington and the other Founding Fathers mentioned. ButContinue reading “Washington’s Master Bedroom – Vignette”

Attic Clock

Don’t forget that on March 8, all the clocks will “spring forward” for daylight saving time. The time will move ahead by one hour and we’ll lose an hour of sleep. But we’ll gain extra sunlight and the pleasure of knowing that spring is near – it arrives on March 19 to be exact. TheContinue reading “Attic Clock”

Washington’s Conference Room – Fireback

For Presidents’ Day, I thought I’d offer this image, which has never been seen before other than by National Park Service personnel. Nor has it ever been printed or publicly exhibited. Even during a tour, it would not be possible to get a clear, head-on view of this cast iron fireback. The photograph is partContinue reading “Washington’s Conference Room – Fireback”

The Other Side: Pompey

February is Black History Month and this photograph was one of the prints on display during solo exhibitions I had at New York City’s African Burial Ground National Monument and other venues. The burial ground, located in Mastic Beach, Long Island, is believed to be the site where some of William Floyd’s slaves are buried.Continue reading “The Other Side: Pompey”

From the Washington’s Headquarters Collection

The Ford Mansion at Sunrise Another iconic president with strong ties to a home is George Washington. The Ford Mansion in New Jersey was his military headquarters during the winter encampment of 1779-80. It is now the site of Morristown National Historical Park. I was very motivated to create this photograph. As a night-person, itContinue reading “From the Washington’s Headquarters Collection”

From the William Floyd Collection

The Other Side I present this photograph in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and Civil Rights Day in Arizona and New Hampshire, all of which fall on January 20. This image is from the first photographic collection centering on the burial ground of the forgotten slaves from the William Floyd Estate in Mastic,Continue reading “From the William Floyd Collection”

Street Photography: Icons of New York

The red sandstone of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church caught my attention. I positioned myself to photograph the tower so that its shape mirrored the angles of the blue glass skyscraper in the background. The old and the modern, the warm red bricks and the cool blue glass, the spiritual and the commercial all provideContinue reading “Street Photography: Icons of New York”